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alexsyanna123
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What does this excerpt from act 1 of Romeo and Juliet reveal about the Montague-Capulet feud? ABRAHAM: Do you bite your thumb at us, sir? SAMPSON: I do bite my thumb, sir. ABRAHAM: Do you bite your thumb at us, sir? SAMPSON: (aside to GREGORY) Is the law of our side, if I say ay? GREGORY: No. SAMPSON: No, sir, I do not bite my thumb at you, sir, but I bite my thumb, sir. GREGORY: Do you quarrel, sir? ABRAHAM: Quarrel sir! no, sir. SAMPSON: If you do, sir, I am for you: I serve as good a man as you. ABRAHAM: No better. SAMPSON: Well, sir. GREGORY: Say 'better:' here comes one of my master's kinsmen. SAMPSON: Yes, better, sir. ABRAHAM: You lie. SAMPSON: Draw, if you be men. Gregory, remember thy swashing blow. -The servants are more serious about the feud than their masters. -The servants of both households use the feud as an excuse to pick fights with -The Capulet-Montague feud is petty, foolish, and easily blown out of proportion. -The servants don’t take the feud seriously and are disinterested in its outcome. -The young noblemen of both houses use the feud as an excuse to pick

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chrissaccoh

In reality, my teacher told me that this conflict goes all the way down to the servants not just the Montague's and Capulet's. The feud runs deep, and if even the servants quarrel, then it's a big deal. So most likely the servants are more serious about the feud than their masters. (Even though their masters come and also join the brawl) Along with, The Capulet-Montague feud is petty, foolish, and easily blown out of proportion.

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